"मैराथन" के अवतरणों में अंतर

624 बैट्स् जोड़े गए ,  11 वर्ष पहले
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==प्रारंभ==
[[File:Phidippides.jpg|thumb|Painting depicting [[Pheidippides]] giving word of victory at the [[Battle of Marathon]] to the people of [[Athens]]]]
''मैराथन'' नाम [[फ़ेडिप्पिडिस]] नामक [[प्राचीन यूनान|यूनानी]] धावक की किंवदंती से आया है। किंवदंती कहती है कि उन्हें[[मैराथन यूनान|मैराथन]] से ऐथेंस यह घोषित करने के लिए भेजा गया था कि [[फ़ारसी साम्राज्य|फ़ारसियों]] को [[मैराथन के युद्ध]] में हरा दिया गया है
The name ''Marathon'' comes from the legend of [[Pheidippides]], a [[Ancient Greece|Greek]] messenger. The legend states that he was sent from the battlefield of [[Marathon, Greece|Marathon]] to Athens to announce that the [[Persian Empire|Persians]] had been defeated in the [[Battle of Marathon]] (in which he had just fought),<ref name=galloway>{{Cite web|url=http://www.jeffgalloway.com/retreats/athens.html |title=Retreats&nbsp;— Athens |publisher=Jeffgalloway.com |date= |accessdate=2009-08-22}}</ref> which took place in August or September, 490 BC.<ref name = date>[http://skytonight.com/about/pressreleases/3309276.html "The Moon and the Marathon", ''Sky & Telescope'' Sept. 2004]</ref> It is said that he ran the entire distance without stopping and burst into the assembly, exclaiming "{{lang|el|Νενικήκαμεν}}" (Nenikékamen, 'We have won.') before collapsing and dying.<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/Olympics/faq10.html |title=Ancient Olympics FAQ 10 |publisher=Perseus.tufts.edu |date= |accessdate=2009-08-22}}</ref> The account of the run from Marathon to Athens first appears in [[Plutarch]]'s ''On the Glory of Athens'' in the 1st century AD which quotes from [[Heraclides Ponticus]]'s lost work, giving the runner's name as either Thersipus of Erchius or Eucles.<ref>Moralia 347C</ref> [[Lucian of Samosata]] (2nd century AD) also gives the story but names the runner Philippides (not Pheidippides).<ref>A slip of the tongue in Salutation, Chapter 3</ref>
 
The name ''Marathon'' comes from the legend of [[Pheidippides]], a [[Ancient Greece|Greek]] messenger. The legend states that he was sent from the battlefield of [[Marathon, Greece|Marathon]] to Athens to announce that the [[Persian Empire|Persians]] had been defeated in the [[Battle of Marathon]] (in which he had just fought),<ref name=galloway>{{Cite web|url=http://www.jeffgalloway.com/retreats/athens.html |title=Retreats&nbsp;— Athens |publisher=Jeffgalloway.com |date= |accessdate=2009-08-22}}</ref> which took place in August or September, 490 BC.<ref name = date>[http://skytonight.com/about/pressreleases/3309276.html "The Moon and the Marathon", ''Sky & Telescope'' Sept. 2004]</ref> It is said that he ran the entire distance without stopping and burst into the assembly, exclaiming "{{lang|el|Νενικήκαμεν}}" (Nenikékamen, 'We have won.') before collapsing and dying.<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/Olympics/faq10.html |title=Ancient Olympics FAQ 10 |publisher=Perseus.tufts.edu |date= |accessdate=2009-08-22}}</ref> The account of the run from Marathon to Athens first appears in [[Plutarch]]'s ''On the Glory of Athens'' in the 1st century AD which quotes from [[Heraclides Ponticus]]'s lost work, giving the runner's name as either Thersipus of Erchius or Eucles.<ref>Moralia 347C</ref> [[Lucian of Samosata]] (2nd century AD) also gives the story but names the runner Philippides (not Pheidippides).<ref>A slip of the tongue in Salutation, Chapter 3</ref>
 
There is debate about the historical accuracy of this legend.<ref name=Prologue>{{Cite web|url=http://www.marathonguide.com/history/olympicmarathons/prologue.cfm |title=Prologue: The Legend |publisher=Marathonguide.com |date= |accessdate=2009-08-22}}</ref><ref>''Persian Fire'' by Tom Holland</ref> The Greek historian [[Herodotus]], the main source for the [[Greco-Persian Wars]], mentions Pheidippides as the messenger who ran from [[Athens]] to [[Sparta]] asking for help, and then ran back, a distance of over {{convert|240|km|mi|sp=uk}}<ref>[http://www.spartathlon.gr/TheRace.html SPARTATHLON ::: International Spartathlon Association]{{Dead link|date=August 2009}}</ref> each way.<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.coolrunning.co.nz/articles/2002a007.html#appendix |title=The Great Marathon Myth |publisher=Coolrunning.co.nz |date= |accessdate=2009-08-22}}</ref> In some Herodotus manuscripts the name of the runner between Athens and Sparta is given as Philippides. Herodotus makes no mention of a messenger sent from Marathon to Athens, and relates that the main part of the Athenian army, having already fought and won the grueling battle, and fearing a naval raid by the Persian fleet against an undefended Athens, marched quickly back from the battle to Athens, arriving the same day.
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